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CertificationPG Our Rating

Phyllis Dietrichson is trapped in a loveless marriage to a man who inspires in her nothing but contempt, but rather than leave him Phyllis decides to kill him and collect on the insurance policy she's had set up with the help of her lover, and naive partner in crime, insurance salesman Walter Neff. The only flaws in their plan are the company's reluctance to pay out so much, the diligence of Neff's increasingly suspicious colleague, (and his 'little man'), and the exemplary ruthlessness of Ph find out more...


Certification15 Our Rating

Now regarded as a classic, this is the first Dracula film that Hammer Horror made. Bits such as the famous opening shot with the menacing shadow of Lee gliding down the stairs to emerge as a crisply charming aristocrat, still look excellent. Required viewing for horror buffs. find out more...

CertificationPG Our Rating

The original 1953 classic has a suitably sinister Vincent Price going that extra mile to ensure the realism of his wax effigies. Creepy, camp and kitsch it's wonderful. Check out the youthful Charles Bronson! find out more...

CertificationPG Our Rating

The Fane family are an unusual, if not unhinged, group of individuals, but their nanny is in a league of her own. 'The Nanny' is a delicious psychological thriller which pays considerable homage in its style and atmosphere to Bette Davis' earlier 'Whatever Happened to Baby Jane'. find out more...

Certification18 Our Rating

Set against the background of the English Civil War, this tale of the violent persecution of alleged witches by the eponymous central character is a masterpiece of 60's British cinema. Excellent performances, (especially Vincent Price's), complement evocative use of scenery. One point of interest is the changes in film stock, which makes the film appear redder at the end than at the beginning, a deliberate ploy on behalf of the director who uses the deepening crimson to symbolise the story's find out more...